For adult patients with moderately to severely active UC or CD when other therapies have not worked well enough.

INDICATIONS: Entyvio (vedolizumab) is indicated for adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) who have had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids, or who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to an immunomodulator or a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker.1

In UC, Entyvio is indicated for inducing and maintaining clinical response and clinical remission, improving the endoscopic appearance of the mucosa, and achieving corticosteroid-free remission.

In CD, Entyvio is indicated for achieving clinical response, clinical remission, and corticosteroid-free remission.

Clinical Data

Long term focus—From the Start

UC Data

For adult patients with moderately to severely active UC or CD when other therapies have not worked well enough.

INDICATIONS: Entyvio (vedolizumab) is indicated for adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) who have had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids, or who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to an immunomodulator or a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker.1

In UC, Entyvio is indicated for inducing and maintaining clinical response and clinical remission, improving the endoscopic appearance of the mucosa, and achieving corticosteroid-free remission.

In CD, Entyvio is indicated for achieving clinical response, clinical remission, and corticosteroid-free remission.

For adult patients with moderately to severely active UC
for whom other therapies have not worked well enough.

Turn to Entyvio first for rapid response and
lasting remission1

Overall population

Overall population Overall population

UC TRIALS I AND II


Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies enrolled adult patients with moderately to severely active UC who had failed at least 1 conventional therapy, including corticosteroids or immunomodulators and/or ≥1 anti-TNFα therapy. In UC Trial I (N=374), patients were randomized (3:2) to receive Entyvio 300 mg or placebo by intravenous infusion at Weeks 0 and 2. The primary end point for UC Trial I was the proportion of patients with clinical response (reduction in complete Mayo score of ≥3 points and ≥30% from baseline with an accompanying decrease in rectal bleeding subscore of ≥1 point or absolute rectal bleeding subscore of ≤1 point) at Week 6. In UC Trial II (N=373), patients receiving Entyvio who demonstrated clinical response at Week 6 (from UC Trial I or an open-label cohort) were randomized (1:1:1) to receive either Entyvio 300 mg every 8 weeks, Entyvio 300 mg every 4 weeks, or placebo every 4 weeks. The primary end point for UC Trial II was the proportion of patients in clinical remission (complete Mayo score ≤2 and no individual subscore >1) at Week 52. Concomitant aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, and immunomodulators were permitted.

UC Trials I and II: Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies enrolled adult patients with moderately to severely active UC who had failed at least 1 conventional therapy, including corticosteroids or immunomodulators and/or ≥1 anti-TNFα therapy. In UC Trial I (N=374), patients were randomized (3:2) to receive Entyvio 300 mg or placebo by intravenous infusion at Weeks 0 and 2. The primary end point for UC Trial I was the proportion of patients with clinical response (reduction in complete Mayo score of ≥3 points and ≥30% from baseline with an accompanying decrease in rectal bleeding subscore of ≥1 point or absolute rectal bleeding subscore of ≤1 point) at Week 6. In UC Trial II (N=373), patients receiving Entyvio who demonstrated clinical response at Week 6 (from UC Trial I or an open-label cohort) were randomized (1:1:1) to receive either Entyvio 300 mg every 8 weeks, Entyvio 300 mg every 4 weeks, or placebo every 4 weeks. The primary end point for UC Trial II was the proportion of patients in clinical remission (complete Mayo score ≤2 and no individual subscore >1) at Week 52. Concomitant aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, and immunomodulators were permitted.

Anti-TNFα naïve subpopulation: Rates of response
and remission2,6

Rates of response and remission Rates of response and remission

Anti-TNFα failure subpopulation: Rates of response
and remission2,6

Rates of response and remission Rates of response and remission

Rates of visible endoscopic improvement1,2

Rates of visible endoscopic improvement Rates of visible endoscopic improvement

CI = confidence interval
*Exploratory end points are not powered for statistical significance.


At baseline, patients in the clinical studies presented with an endoscopic subscore of 2 or 3. Improvement of endoscopic appearance of the mucosa was defined as an endoscopic subscore of 0 or 1.1

Example endoscopic images

Example endoscopic images Example endoscopic images

Images are for example purposes only and are not representative of corresponding subscores shown, as multiple images can represent a single subscore; images are not results from studied patients. Adapted from de Lange T, Larsen S, Aabakken L. BMC Gastroenterology. 2004;4:9. Copyright 2004 BioMed Central.



Important Safety Information

  • ENTYVIO (vedolizumab) for injection is contraindicated in patients who have had a known serious or severe hypersensitivity reaction to ENTYVIO or any of its excipients.
  • Infusion-related reactions and hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have occurred. Allergic reactions including dyspnea, bronchospasm, urticaria, flushing, rash, and increased blood pressure and heart rate have also been observed. If anaphylaxis or other serious allergic reactions occur, discontinue administration of ENTYVIO immediately and initiate appropriate treatment.
  • Patients treated with ENTYVIO are at increased risk for developing infections. Serious infections have been reported in patients treated with ENTYVIO, including anal abscess, sepsis (some fatal), tuberculosis, salmonella sepsis, Listeria meningitis, giardiasis, and cytomegaloviral colitis. ENTYVIO is not recommended in patients with active, severe infections until the infections are controlled. Consider withholding ENTYVIO in patients who develop a severe infection while on treatment with ENTYVIO. Exercise caution in patients with a history of recurring severe infections. Consider screening for tuberculosis (TB) according to the local practice.
  • Although no cases of PML have been observed in ENTYVIO clinical trials, JC virus infection resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and death has occurred in patients treated with another integrin receptor antagonist. A risk of PML cannot be ruled out. Monitor patients for any new or worsening neurological signs or symptoms. Typical signs and symptoms associated with PML are diverse, progress over days to weeks, and include progressive weakness on one side of the body or clumsiness of limbs, disturbance of vision, and changes in thinking, memory, and orientation leading to confusion and personality changes. If PML is suspected, withhold dosing with ENTYVIO and refer to a neurologist; if confirmed, discontinue ENTYVIO dosing permanently.
  • There have been reports of elevations of transaminase and/or bilirubin in patients receiving ENTYVIO. ENTYVIO should be discontinued in patients with jaundice or other evidence of significant liver injury.
  • Prior to initiating treatment with ENTYVIO, all patients should be brought up to date with all immunizations according to current immunization guidelines. Patients receiving ENTYVIO may receive non-live vaccines and may receive live vaccines if the benefits outweigh the risks.
  • Most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥3% and ≥1% higher than placebo): nasopharyngitis, headache, arthralgia, nausea, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, fatigue, cough, bronchitis, influenza, back pain, rash, pruritus, sinusitis, oropharyngeal pain, and pain in extremities.

Indications

Adult Ulcerative Colitis (UC)

ENTYVIO (vedolizumab) is indicated in adult patients with moderately to severely active UC who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker or immunomodulator; or had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids for inducing and maintaining clinical response, inducing and maintaining clinical remission, improving endoscopic appearance of the mucosa, and achieving corticosteroid-free remission.

Adult Crohn’s Disease (CD)

ENTYVIO (vedolizumab) is indicated in adult patients with moderately to severely active CD who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to a TNF blocker or immunomodulator; or had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids for achieving clinical response, achieving clinical remission, and achieving corticosteroid-free remission.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide.

  1. Entyvio [prescribing information]. Deerfield, IL: Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.
  2. Data on file. Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc. Deerfield, IL.
  3. Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, Sands BE, et al; for the GEMINI 1 Study Group. N Engl J Med. 2013;369(8):699-710.
  4. Sandborn WJ, Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, et al; for GEMINI 2 Study Group. N Engl J Med. 2013;369(8):711-721.
  5. Colombel JF, Sands BE, Rutgeerts P, et al. Gut. 2016. doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2015-311079.
  6. Feagan BG, Rubin DT, Danese S, et al. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017;15(2):229-239.e5.
  7. Sands BE, Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, et al. Gastroenterology. 2014;147(3):618-627.e3.
  8. Xavier RJ, Podolsky DK. Nature. 2007;448(7152):427-434.
  9. Briskin M, Winsor-Hines D, Shyjan A, et al. Am J Pathol. 1997;151(1):97-110.

Important Safety Information

  • ENTYVIO (vedolizumab) for injection is contraindicated in patients who have had a known serious or severe hypersensitivity reaction to ENTYVIO or any of its excipients.
  • Infusion-related reactions and hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have occurred. Allergic reactions including dyspnea, bronchospasm, urticaria, flushing, rash, and increased blood pressure and heart rate have also been observed. If anaphylaxis or other serious allergic reactions occur, discontinue administration of ENTYVIO immediately and initiate appropriate treatment.
  • Patients treated with ENTYVIO are at increased risk for developing infections. Serious infections have been reported in patients treated with ENTYVIO, including anal abscess, sepsis (some fatal), tuberculosis, salmonella sepsis, Listeria meningitis, giardiasis, and cytomegaloviral colitis. ENTYVIO is not recommended in patients with active, severe infections until the infections are controlled. Consider withholding ENTYVIO in patients who develop a severe infection while on treatment with ENTYVIO. Exercise caution in patients with a history of recurring severe infections. Consider screening for tuberculosis (TB) according to the local practice.
  • Although no cases of PML have been observed in ENTYVIO clinical trials, JC virus infection resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and death has occurred in patients treated with another integrin receptor antagonist. A risk of PML cannot be ruled out. Monitor patients for any new or worsening neurological signs or symptoms. Typical signs and symptoms associated with PML are diverse, progress over days to weeks, and include progressive weakness on one side of the body or clumsiness of limbs, disturbance of vision, and changes in thinking, memory, and orientation leading to confusion and personality changes. If PML is suspected, withhold dosing with ENTYVIO and refer to a neurologist; if confirmed, discontinue ENTYVIO dosing permanently.
  • There have been reports of elevations of transaminase and/or bilirubin in patients receiving ENTYVIO. ENTYVIO should be discontinued in patients with jaundice or other evidence of significant liver injury.
  • Prior to initiating treatment with ENTYVIO, all patients should be brought up to date with all immunizations according to current immunization guidelines. Patients receiving ENTYVIO may receive non-live vaccines and may receive live vaccines if the benefits outweigh the risks.
  • Most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥3% and ≥1% higher than placebo): nasopharyngitis, headache, arthralgia, nausea, pyrexia, upper respiratory tract infection, fatigue, cough, bronchitis, influenza, back pain, rash, pruritus, sinusitis, oropharyngeal pain, and pain in extremities.

Indications

Adult Ulcerative Colitis (UC)

ENTYVIO (vedolizumab) is indicated in adult patients with moderately to severely active UC who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker or immunomodulator; or had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids for inducing and maintaining clinical response, inducing and maintaining clinical remission, improving endoscopic appearance of the mucosa, and achieving corticosteroid-free remission.

Adult Crohn’s Disease (CD)

ENTYVIO (vedolizumab) is indicated in adult patients with moderately to severely active CD who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to a TNF blocker or immunomodulator; or had an inadequate response with, were intolerant to, or demonstrated dependence on corticosteroids for achieving clinical response, achieving clinical remission, and achieving corticosteroid-free remission.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide.

  1. Entyvio [prescribing information]. Deerfield, IL: Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.
  2. Data on file. Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc. Deerfield, IL.
  3. Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, Sands BE, et al; for the GEMINI 1 Study Group. N Engl J Med. 2013;369(8):699-710.
  4. Sandborn WJ, Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, et al; for GEMINI 2 Study Group. N Engl J Med. 2013;369(8):711-721.
  5. Colombel JF, Sands BE, Rutgeerts P, et al. Gut. 2016. doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2015-311079.
  6. Feagan BG, Rubin DT, Danese S, et al. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017;15(2):229-239.e5.
  7. Sands BE, Feagan BG, Rutgeerts P, et al. Gastroenterology. 2014;147(3):618-627.e3.
  8. Xavier RJ, Podolsky DK. Nature. 2007;448(7152):427-434.
  9. Briskin M, Winsor-Hines D, Shyjan A, et al. Am J Pathol. 1997;151(1):97-110.